Responsibility

A few months ago I was tapped to be the Lead Artist for YPT’s Special Project with Fannie Mae’s Help the Homeless Program. YPT would partner with five schools and five community organizations to conduct workshops exploring issues of homelessness. The participants would create original writing exploring the topic and also engage in group discussion. My role would be to turn all of this material into a play.

This is a very different kind of playwriting than the kind we usually teach our students. It’s not what most people think of when they hear the word “playwright.” For me, being a playwright in a collaborative process begins with the admission that I do not know everything. (I am a somewhat notorious control freak, so this is harder than you might think!) That admission is what allows me to receive the gift of inspiration, stories, writing, and ideas from others. I got to pull from the memories and thoughts of so many when I cobbled this play together. Collaboration made it that much more rich.

I spent a lot of time at home listening to the audio recording of these workshops. Many of the people who participated had direct experience with homelessness, and the stories they told are compelling and heartbreaking. I was humbled by the generosity these men and women showed by sharing their lives with us. I became overwhelmed by a sense of responsibility to them.

This responsibility made me more creative. I used not only direct quotes, but questions, concepts, and ways of communicating. I listened to YPT Associate Artistic Director Patrick Torres ask, “Why would someone not want to help the homeless?” The reasons suggested by the participants became a character. The text spoken by this character is original, but his way of thinking and seeing the world were created in the workshops. The play reflects the people we met through this process in myriad ways.

The play, The Good Neighbor, will be performed as part of the Express Tour. The performance itself will also be an act of collaboration. You will have the opportunity to contribute your voice to the conversation. I hope you do.

                              

Nicole
Program Manager

YPT Collaborates with Life Pieces to Masterpieces to Tell the Story of Historic Woodlawn Cemetery

Over the past three weeks, I’ve had the immense pleasure to work with the young men of Life Pieces to Masterpieces (LPTM) on one of our current special projects, a new play we’re creating with the Ward 7 community about historic Woodlawn Cemetery.  As soon as I knew we’d be working in Ward 7, my home neighborhood, I knew LPTM would be a great partner for it.  LPTM is an extraordinary mentorship program for young men in Ward 7.  They give young men life and art skills that allow them to embrace their past and present and prepare for their future.  The young men explore leadership, responsibility, community and create paintings based on their own life stories.  Our group, the Legacy class, mostly consisting of 11 year old young men, began working with me about two and a half weeks ago on workshops exploring Woodlawn Cemetery, its history and the history of those interred at Woodlawn.  We explored how the site relates to our neighborhood and how learning about some of the extraordinary people buried at Woodlawn can help all of us better understand our history and prepare for our future.  For example, Senator Blanche Bruce, born a slave who ultimately became the first African American to serve a full term in the US Senate, is buried there.  Congressman Langston, first African American Congressman from Virginia and first civilian dean of Howard University Law School, is buried there.  As well as thousands of extraordinary women who were scholars, artists, educators and homemakers — a total of almost 36,000 people, many in unmarked graves, having been moved from previous sites throughout the city.

After we explored the history and the young men took a tour of the cemetery, we began sketching.  They sketched about 15 pictures and then chose 7 of those to paint.  First their teachers set up huge blank canvasses on the wall.  Each young man was given three primary colors and tasked with creating their own rich textures and colors and painting the canvasses freely, resulting in about 12 different colors of canvas.  Once these were dry the next day, the students figured out what figures or shapes they needed to create to convey their sketch onto canvas.  They then picked from the larges canvases they’d painted and drew the shapes on the back, then cutting these shapes out of the canvases.  Then they painted other canvases as backdrops for their paintings and, once they were dry, laid out the figures, symbols and landmarks from Woodlawn they’d created onto the backdrop.  They then sewed these patterns and shapes onto the canvas and stretched the canvases onto wooden frames.

The seven resulting paintings, all inspired by Woodlawn, will serve as the backdrop and setting for our readings of the play we’re creating with the community.  Plus, these young men have created poems and monologues about their insights and inspirations from Woodlawn, all of which will be added into the stew of the play, mixing their voices into a tapestry of voices about Woodlawn that will not only share our history but also our community.   The resulting paintings are extraordinary and inspired — I can’t wait for you to see them and meet these young men at the readings we’ll hold on September 11th at Harman Hall downtown, and at Woodlawn Cemetery, as part of a huge volunteer and service celebration at the site.  I hope you’ll come see us and join in our community!

 

You can learn more about YPT’s Woodlawn Cemetery project on YPT’s website.

You can learn more about Life Pieces to Masterpieces here.

David
Producing Artistic Director and CEO