Reflections on the Lincoln Heights Arts Camp

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Lincoln Heights Arts Camp campers and teaching artists after their final showcase!

In July 2016, YPT held our first-ever multidisciplinary arts camp: the Lincoln Heights Arts Camp! Led by YPT staff and local artists, campers explored the faces and places of Northeast DC through photography, playwriting, audio design and visual art. The camp culminated in a final showcase, where campers read excerpts from their plays and showed off photos and art pieces that encapsulated their lives in Northeast!

After camp ended, camper Brittany Butler and photography week teaching artist Kenji Jasper wrote blog posts about their experience in camp. Read on for their thoughts and memories of the Lincoln Heights Arts Camp!


 Lincoln Heights Arts Camp Blog – Brittany Butler

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Brittany Butler (R) performs during the Lincoln Heights Arts Camp’s final showcase.

My name is Brittany Butler, I’m 17 years old and I was a camper at YPT’s Lincoln Heights Art Camp. I was placed here as a job assignment for the Summer Youth Employment Program so I didn’t really know too much about the camp. IMG_0691My first day there was not what I expected and I honestly had no interest in staying for the whole camp. There was a lot of young kids there and I was basically the only one there that was my age so I was pretty bored. The following week is when things began to get better! There were no more young kids and more teens around my age began to come. The activities we did the first week were very fun as well. We started off learning a bit about Photography with Mr. Jasper.  I liked working with him because he made us engage with each other by having us work in groups. Doing this helped us get to know each other a little better. We also took a few little trips while working on photography. We went to Benning Road Metro Station, Marvin Gaye Park and to the famous landmark, The Shrimp Boat to shoot some fun shots of each other. The first week’s activities were so fun that I was really looking forward to next week which was playwriting.

Week Two we worked with Ms. Harris and Ms. Laurie to write a short play for our final showcase. The idea of playwriting did not seem like something I’d enjoy at first but of course Ms. Harris made the week very enjoyable! We chose a photo out of the ones we shot during Week One to base our play off. Mine ended up being about a girl who had no friends at school but had a connection with trees. She also had super powers that her mom didn’t like which led to an unexpected turn of events in the play! I ended up really enjoying the playwriting week and didn’t want to move on to the next week because I had so many ideas I wanted to add to my play.

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Sound design with Kevin!

Week Three was music! We worked with Mr. Kevin who was a music engineer who worked with many people whose music I actually listen to. This week turned out being my favorite week out of the entire camp!! We created really cool sound effects and music that we added to our plays. It was really cool seeing how he could make a song sound like it was coming out of earphones or make footsteps sound far away to close up by just using one computer program. At the end of Week Three I was really excited to perform my play because of these sounds we created because it made everything more interesting!

The fourth and final week was visual arts. During this week we worked with Ms. Asha and made collages about our passions. I chose to do mine about Cheer because that’s one of my passions. I gathered a bunch of my favorite action shots of my cheer team and I, printed them out and created a beautiful collage that I am very proud of. So proud of that I took it home and hung it on my wall!! Next we made keychains out of wood. I wasn’t sure what to do so I ended up just writing my zodiac sign and birthday on it with puffy paint. When it was finished it actually looked really good. We also decorated old records. I kept this project simple and just painted my favorite saying on it, “Always Strive and Prosper”! I plan on hanging this in my locker when I go back to school as motivation to get through my SENIOR YEAR!

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Final showcase photos. “Always Strive and Prosper” on the left in green!

At the end the Lincoln Heights Art Camp ended up being a complete success and I am glad I got to spend my summer being involved with this camp. Not only was it fun but it taught me a lot as well and also brought out the creative side of me which I really enjoyed. The final showcase was very bittersweet because I was finally able to show everything I did throughout the camp but I also meant that the camp was over. I made some new friends that I look forward to building better friendships with and met some awesome teachers and mentors like, Ms. Harris and Ms. Duncan, which I plan on keeping in touch with for things in the future. 

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Thanks to Brittany Butler for this blog post!

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Kenji Jasper speaks at the Lincoln Heights Arts Camp’s final showcase.

Teacher’s Log: Photography Week – Kenji Jasper

I came to YPT as a veteran of teaching creative workshops for inner-city youth.  I had started just barely out of high school as a co-instructor for The Institute for the Preservation and Study of African American Writing, which eventually led to my work with organizations like the Brooklyn Center for the Environment, The Bedford-Stuyvesant ‘I Have A Dream’ program, CentroNia and most recently Guerilla Arts and The College Success Foundation.  I knew how to work with teens, but I had only taught photography once before.  And as I would only have three days of class time, I decided that I would focus less on techniques and equipment and more on sparking competition between groups and allowing the students to have a good time in the rising summer heat.

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Having grown up partially in Benning Heights, I knew the area where Daybreak Ministries was holding the camp.  So I developed a curriculum based around students working in small groups outside of the classroom for the second half of each day, following an in-class first hour where they worked individually [ fortunately in air conditioning].  I knew that the more I kept them moving, the easier it would be to engage them in photography.  Using cellphones and two YPT iPads, students found the picture taking to be easy and enjoyable.  Those that didn’t like taking pictures served as models and muses for the others.

Once they began to see their work on the overhead projector at the start of each day the spirit of pride and competition encouraged them to take better pictures in hopes of cornering a little more spotlight for themselves among their peers.  They scaled high fences and repelled down hills to pose by a creek.  They framed shots on playgrounds and grassy hills behind orange brick buildings surrounding the camp headquarters.  And they now have the photos to prove it.

The best part of the experience for me was watching the students rise to each creative challenge.  Presented with a glass full of candy, each student had to take one photograph for each M&M they ate, resulting in a diverse array of photographs that captured not only the dwindling candy but the other students as they fired their best shots at the exercise.  They did the same with a game of chess and a team battle in playing cards.  With each outing, they learned that neither the job of photographer or model was an easy one.  But with effort and focus, everything is possible.

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M&Ms have never looked so beautiful!

My reward came with the sadness and regret students expressed on the last day, as they all seemed to wish that we had more time.  Working with YPT provided me with one of my best teaching experiences to date.  I hope that we get to work together again.

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Thank you to Kenji Jasper for a terrific week! The students – and we – love you!

The 2016 New Play Festival – Playwright Speeches

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YPT’s 2016 New Play Festival featured fifteen hilarious, touching, charming and empowering plays written by young playwrights from across the DC area. From stories of time travel and magical homework to dance-offs and basketball showdowns, these fifteen plays shared the powerful voices of some of DC’s most exciting young artists!

Before the performance of their play, each playwright spoke to the crowd about their work, their dreams and their advice for other young playwrights. Their speeches were so inspiring that we decided to share them all with you in their entirety! 

Read on and enjoy!


NPF 2016 Night One Postcard FINAL FRONT

The 2016 New Play Festival – Night One
Monday, April 11, 2016
7pm
GALA Hispanic Theatre
Elementary School Plays


 

NPF 2016 Night One-578Wesley Hoy, Playwright,
Arrowstone in Woodland

My name is Wesley Hoy, and my play is called Arrowstone in Woodland. I am in the 4th grade at Bancroft Elementary School. The hardest part of writing it was coming up with ideas. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is that you should think before you write. I hope that in the future I will write another play. When I have a free afternoon my favorite thing to do is to play with my friends, and one thing that might surprise people is that I don’t like hot dogs. If I could change the world, I would want everyone to recycle. Now I hope that you enjoy my play, Arrowstone in Woodland.


NPF 2016 Night One-619Martina Mendoza, Playwright,
To Light Village We Go!

My name is Martina Mendoza, and my play is called To Light Village We Go! I am in the 5th grade at Harriet Tubman Elementary School. I got the idea for this play from when me and my best friend, Harmony, both wanted the same thing in 2nd grade. When I have a free afternoon my favorite thing to do is watch movies with my sisters. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is: be creative. I hope that audiences who see my play will enjoy it, and see that you don’t always have to start out as friends with the people around you, but you can become friends later. I hope that in the future I am successful as a teacher. And now, please enjoy my play, To Light Village We Go!
NPF 2016 Night One-647Aarionna Thomas, Playwright,
The Two Parents

My name is Aarionna Thomas and my play is called The Two Parents. I am in the 5th grade at Orr Elementary School, and when I have a free afternoon my favorite thing to do is write, sing, dance, and watch TV. I hope that audiences who see my play will love it and want me to write another one. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is: keep working hard and write what’s on your mind. I hope that in the future I will be a great writer. So please sit back and enjoy my play, The Two Parents.


NPF 2016 Night One-669Branaya Reese Brown, Playwright,
Mr. Rawr and the Kitty

My name is Branaya Reese Brown, and my play is called Mr. Rawr and the Kitty. I am in the 5th grade, and wrote this play when I was at Watkins Elementary School. I got the idea for this play from my imagination and a drawing I made. The hardest part of writing it was turning my drawing into a play. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is: find something you like and write about it! I love animals, and one thing about me that might surprise people is that I can tell facts about over 100 animals. I hope that in the future I work at a zoo filled with animals, and if I were elected President, I would demand all animal-related books be sent to me. I hope that my play makes you laugh and smile, so please enjoy Mr. Rawr and the Kitty.
NPF 2016 Night One-706Talayia Richardson, Playwright,
God and Gabriel
My name is Talayia Richardson, and my play is called God and Gabriel. I am in the 5th grade at Wheatley Education Campus. I got the idea for this play from church, and a picture at another program. The hardest part of writing it was figuring out how to explain how God and Gabriel had a misunderstanding. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is to have good grammar and feel like you are in the audience and ask yourself questions about the play. I hope that in the future I will be rich and make plays and perform them in public. If I were elected President, I would give everybody the chance to vote and would give everybody a million dollars. Now I hope that enjoy and like my play, God and Gabriel.
NPF 2016 Night One-735Maddie Salunga, Playwright,
The Time Trap
My name is Maddie Salunga, and my play is called The Time Trap. I am in the 5th grade at Watkins Elementary School. I got the idea for this play from when my grandfather had skin cancer. I hope that audiences who see my play will enjoy watching it as much as I enjoyed writing it. One thing about me that might surprise people is that even though I am athletic and am tough, I like being female. I also really like science and the outdoors. I hope that in the future there will be more cures for more illnesses. I would like to thank Ms. Joan, who came to our class and helped us out. This play is dedicated to my family and friends, but specifically my grandfather. Thank you, and please enjoy my play, The Time Trap.


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The 2016 New Play Festival – Night Two
Monday, April 18, 2016
7pm
Anacostia Playhouse
High School Plays

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Jarid Shields, Playwright, (Room)

My name is Jarid Shields and my play is called (Room). I am in the 12th grade at Eastern High School. My advice to other young people writing a play is: just write what you think is important or whatever you find interesting or funny. No idea is a bad idea. One thing about me that might surprise people is that I didn’t really consider myself a good writer; however, through this process, I have gained more confidence in my capabilities. I hope that audiences who see my play will gain a better understanding of the difficulties that people with illnesses and disorders, whether mental or physical, have to go through. I hope that in the future we can all be more sympathetic towards one another and be a little less quick to judge and stigmatize. Thank you, and please enjoy my play, (Room).

 

NPF 2016 Night Two-900Rachael Brock, Playwright, School

My name is Rachael and my play is called School.  I’m in the 10th grade at Anacostia High School.  I got the idea for my play from my brain—I have an overactive imagination.  The hardest part of writing was that I wrote a play and it was 38 pages long, so they had to cut it short. That broke my heart.  I hope that the audience, who see my play will love it and give good and bad feedback to know what I should strengthen for next time.  My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is to do it and always use imagination.  Don’t let no one bring you down.  One thing about me that might surprise people is I’m talkative and very playful.  When I have a free afternoon, my favorite thing to do is read and write.  I hope in the future that I’ll never stop reading, and if I were elected president, I would demand everyone to read.  Writing is fundamental.

 

NPF 2016 Night Two-933Ronald Coe III, Playwright, Ron Vs. The Living Homework

My name is Ronald Coe and my play is called Ron vs. the Living Homework. The hardest part of writing it was making the homework come to life. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is: never give up. Keep striving to reach your goal. When I have a free afternoon my favorite thing to do is to play video games and listen to music.  I hope that in the future people learn that being mad is going to get you nowhere in life. So now I hope that you laugh and enjoy my play, Ron vs. the Living Homework.

 

NPF 2016 Night Two-973Nomin Ganmend, Playwright, Twins

My name is Nomin Ganmend and my play is called Twins. I am in the 12th grade at Wakefield High School. I hope that audiences who see my play will understand that no matter what happens, you should support your partner. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is to think about real life and show people what they should do to deal with their problems. When I have a free afternoon my favorite thing to do is crafting. I like to do and create new things. I hope that in the future I finish college and get the career I want. So now, please enjoy my play, Twins.


NPF 2016 Night Three Postcard FINAL FRONT

The 2016 New Play Festival – Night Three
Monday, April 25, 2016

7pm
Logan Fringe Arts Space
Elementary and Middle School Plays

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Nafisa Weeks, Playwright, Living the Dream

My name is Nafisa Weeks and my play is called Living the Dream. I am in the 7th grade at Eliot-Hine Middle School. I got the idea for this play from my dream of becoming a CEO. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is: use your imagination. One thing about me that might surprise people is that I like to do adventurous and extreme things such as cliff diving and sky diving. These are things I want to try. I hope that in the future I will be able to look back at all my achievements, and if I were elected President, I would make the world a better place. Now I hope that you will be amazed by my play, Living the Dream.

 

Alice Hockstader Headshot squareAlice Hockstader, Playwright, A Mortal in an Immortal Land

My name is Alice Hockstader and my play is called A Mortal in an Immortal Land. I am in the 7th grade at The Lab School of Washington. I got the idea for this play from Greek Mythology and the Percy Jackson series. When I have a free afternoon my favorite thing to do is read books, and one thing that might surprise people is that I make stories from nothing all the time. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is: do something you know a lot about. I hope that in the future I will be a professor of Greek Mythology, and if I were elected President I would make more National Parks and help conserve animals. Now I hope you enjoy my play, A Mortal in an Immortal Land.

 

Marisa Poe Headshot squareMarisa Poe, Playwright, The Basketball Duel

My name is Marisa Poe and my play is called The Basketball Duel. I am in the 6th grade at Maret School. I got the idea for this play from my love for basketball. I realized how unequal the salaries between men and women professional basketball players are, and wanted to spread the word. I hope that audiences who see my play will understand how unjust the salary differences are and try to make a difference. The hardest part of writing this was probably just starting it. Once I began, though, it became hard to stop. My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is to write about something you care about, and have fun with it! I hope that in the future these salary differences between men and women will change and women will get equal pay for equal work. Thank you, and please enjoy my play, The Basketball Duel.

 

Sierra Morris Headshot squareSierra Morris, Playwright, Show Your Moves

My name is Sierra Morris and my play is called Show Your Moves! I am in the 5th grade at Moten Elementary School. When I have a free afternoon my favorite thing to do is call my friends, go outside, and dance.  My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is: don’t be afraid to show your talent in your plays, because it can probably kick off your future dream. I want someone to see my play and say, “That’s wonderful that a 12 year old black girl is taking her life seriously, and that she wants to do and be something that she wants to do.” If I were elected President, I would stop gun violence and stop the hate of other people, and stop having people live on the street. I hope that in the future me and my family and friends will have a better life and live our dreams. So now please enjoy my play, Show Your Moves!

 

Kreshaun Brooks HeadshotKreshaun Brooks, Playwright, Bob’s Halloween

My name is Kreshaun Brooks and my play is called Bob’s Halloween. I am in the 5th grade at Moten Elementary School. One thing about me that might surprise people is that this is my first time writing a play or anything close to a play. I hope that audiences who see my play will laugh so hard that they jump out of their seats and fly through the roof! My advice to other young people who are interested in writing a play is to write whatever you think the audience will love, and they will love it even more than you thought. I hope that in the future everyone’s house is made of candy and robots make ice cream sundaes for everyone. So now I hope you laugh your pants off and enjoy my play, Bob’s Halloween.

 

Congrats to all our 2016 New Play Festival playwrights! We’re so proud of you!

NPF 2016 Kickoff Party-469

Who’s Next? Dominique Butler and YPT’s Young Artist Fellowship

Dominique Butler cutout “I’m not just writing for myself, I’m writing for everybody.”
– Dominique Butler

The young playwrights that YPT serves are all immensely gifted: smart and creative; funny and dramatic; profoundly invested in the world they create on the page. All go on to do great things, and many who complete our In-School Playwriting Program choose to stay involved with YPT, through our Young Playwrights’ Workshop, Student Advisory Council or other opportunities.

Every so often, however, a playwright comes along who demonstrates a long-term commitment to the craft, whose artistic project exceeds the bounds of one performance and who has shown an interest  in an ongoing mentorship with YPT staff. For those young playwrights, YPT is proud to announce the Young Artist Fellowship: a year-long mentorship designed to engage one teen writer in a play development process from start to finish. Presently in its first year, the Fellowship seeks to cultivate the Young Artist Fellow as an artist as well as a future member of the workforce, teaching accountability and commitment through one-on-one mentorship with a YPT staff member.

YPT’s inaugural Young Artist Fellow, Dominique Butler, emerged from our In-School Program at Cardozo High School with an extraordinary piece of writing. Entitled Like Father, Like Son, Dominique’s play follows a young black man trying not to repeat the mistakes that landed his father in jail. The play’s emotional honesty struck a chord with our New Play Festival readers, and Like Father, Like Son wound up closing our 2015 Festival to resounding applause.

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Dominique watches his words unfold onstage.
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Reginald Richard as Dominique in LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

But Dominique wasn’t done yet. The poet and storyteller, who started writing at age 13 to cope with the death of his grandfather, had more to say—and he wouldn’t stop until he said it. “It happens here all the time…if you’re out there just chilling, you’re a target,” he says. “These people got names.”

The people Dominique means have names like Freddie Gray, Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner: young black men killed by police or other authority figures, victims of a pattern of institutionalized racism and violence that has galvanized our nation. As the #BlackLivesMatter movement rose to prominence, Dominique found himself compelled to join in their call—especially when his own friend, Davon, was shot and killed by DC police. From his grief emerged Who’s Next?, a play which imagines that Davon, Trayvon and Freddie are friends who use music to speak out against police brutality—and whose clarion call leads to a dramatic confrontation with a police officer. “It’s a message,” Dominique says. “It’s not just a play.”

Dominique’s message began to take shape at Curious Theatre Company’s Curious New Voices National Collective in Denver, which he attended over the summer. “Dominique is amazing,” writes Curious New Voices Program Director Dee Covington. “Quiet, diligent, taking it all in. …[The other playwrights] had no idea his piece, at once personal and political, was there to shake up the world.” As Like Father, Like Son had at the 2015 New Play Festival, Who’s Next? closed the Curious New Voices final performance to a standing ovation and watery eyes. “Some people were crying,” Dominique admits.

 

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Dominique and the other playwrights in the post-show talkback.
Actors performing WHO'S NEXT
Professional actors perform WHO’S NEXT? at Curious New Voices.

 

Back in DC, Dominique strove to continue working on Who’s Next?. We at YPT had been considering launching a Young Artist Fellowship for some time, and realized that Dominique’s project provided us with the perfect opportunity to pilot the program. So, in October, 2015, we signed a contract with our first-ever Young Artist Fellow, and began meeting with him regularly to finish Who’s Next? and deepen its message. After a reading at Cardozo High School, Who’s Next?  inspired our next production, Silence Is Violence: Who’s Next?, a professional staged reading and multidisciplinary artistic response to the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

Join us on Monday, February 29, at 7pm at the Anacostia Playhouse for this powerful continuation of YPT’s Silence Is Violence series. Free and open to the public!

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Though Dominique’s time as YPT’s Young Artist Fellow will conclude in June, we are excited to continue the program next year and beyond with another talented young artist. Who will take up the mantle and shape his or her own project? What will the next Young Artist Fellowship hold? How will this one impact Dominique—and, through him, the world—in the next few years? We don’t know yet, but we can’t wait to find out!

Meet Nora Foster and Kaitlyn Murphy!

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Kaitlyn Murphy (L) and Nora Foster (R) pose for a photo shoot.

Nora Foster and Kaitlyn Murphy are two strong, ambitious young women. The DC-area teens, who studied playwriting in YPT’s In-School Playwriting Program then saw their plays come to life in the New Play Festival, dream of making a difference in the world through their words and talents.

Kaitlyn, a freshman at Cardozo Education Campus, is an avid spoken word poet; Nora, a junior at Yorktown High School, enjoys nature photography. Their plays, Ayo’s Audience and Stuck in a Fairy Tale, will be featured in Girls Write Out!, YPT first performance of 2015-2016! Monday, October 19, at 7pm at The Forum in Sidney Harman Hall. FREE!

Click here for more information and tickets!

YPT sat down with Nora and Kaitlyn to learn more about their experience in the program, their hopes for Girls Write Out! and the value of sharing girls’ voices. Read on for the interview and photographs of these fabulous young playwrights!

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YPT: What did you think when the In-School Playwriting Program first came into your classroom?
KM: I was really excited to see what I could write, and [see it] being acted out.

YPT: How did you react when you found out your play was going to be performed?
KM:
There were a lot of students in my class, so when I realized that my play was going to be produced I thought, ‘Oh wow, this is cool!’
NF: I was really surprised, I was really happy…when YPT picked mine, I was just ecstatic. Having people not only compliment your work, but criticize it so you can grow and learn more from professionals [was really great].

GWO Playwright Photo Shoot-25YPT: Tell us about your play!
KM: My play is called Ayo’s Audience. [It’s] about a girl trying to follow her dream to become a spoken word artist. It’s very much like my story, so it was pretty easy to write it. [Ayo] lives with her father, and…is struggling to make him understand that she has a passion for this art. In the end, her father and her overcome obstacles, and their relationship becomes stronger.
NF: My play is Stuck in a Fairy Tale, and this girl basically gets thrown into different fairy tales. Like Snow White, Rapunzel…it’s a twist on these classics.

YPT: Where did that come from in your mind?
NF: I have no idea! We were doing some exercise with YPT, and…all of a sudden it just popped into my head! I was just like, ‘Oh yeah, I’ll write about this!’ Turned out pretty good…

GWO Playwright Photo Shoot-4YPT: What is your play’s moral/what do you want audience members to walk away with?
KM: My wish [is] for everybody to relate to the characters…my moral is, ‘Keep striving for your dream, no matter what. You have to push through the obstacles and keep steady.’
NF: I just hope that when people walk away from seeing my play, that they remember it…you have to do what’s right for you, and no matter what people say you have to know what’s good for you and follow through. Stand up for yourself.
KM: I want more people to involve themselves in the arts more…that’d be a really cool thing, to see other girls involve themselves in things that [are] a release for them.

YPT: What happens when a girl realizes the power of her voice?
KM: I’m still trying to find the power of my voice! (Laughs) The power of your voice comes when you start affecting people by what you say, and you realize that your voice has a meaning, and that it can make an impact on certain situations or people.
NF: Once you find your voice, it makes a really big impact on others. As long as you use it for good, and you tell people…whatever you’re passionate about, it can make a big impact.

YPT: Do you have any advice for young playwrights in YPT’s program right now?
KM: Don’t worry about nobody else. Have your stuff set, do what you need to do—no matter what, your play is amazing, because you wrote it. The process of writing a play is the best thing ever: you just wrote a play! That’s great! I bet you haven’t done that before! …Appreciate it for what it is.
NF: Don’t doubt yourself…just write what you think is good, don’t compare yourself, because everyone is different in their own way, everyone is unique. Just believe in yourself and keep doing what you think is creative.

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Thank you to Nora and Kaitlyn for speaking with YPT! See their creativity on display at Girls Write Out!, Monday, October 19 at 7pm at the Forum in Sidney Harman Hall! FREE! Part of the Women’s Voices Theater Festival.

Click here to reserve your tickets to Girls Write Out!

“One in the Chamber” Response Plays

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(L to R) Noah Chiet, Dwight Tolar, Adrienne Nelson, Liz Osborn and Danielle Bourgeois in One in the Chamber

In late 2014, former YPT Teaching Artist and longtime supporter Adrienne Nelson approached YPT’s Student Advisory Council with a compelling project. She and her team were launching the DC premiere of One in the Chamber, a new play about children and gun violence, and they wanted the Council to get involved.

Stage Fright-503Seeking young people’s perspectives on guns, the Chamber team invited the Council to write response pieces to the play. Four students wrote pieces, and two were selected for a FREE staged reading after the closing performance on Sunday, September 6.

Read excerpts from the four response plays below, then come to Mead Theatre Lab at Flashpoint on 9/6 for a gripping performance and free staged reading! The play begins at 8pm, the reading at 9:30pm.

RSVP on Facebook for more information!

Featured Plays

Our Crafted Night, by Cameron Byrd

Cameron ByrdWINNAH: Guns are okay and all– But who’d want a gun as a gift. I’d rather have skates or a bike.

ELENA: I didn’t know you knew how to handle a gun.

WINNAH: I don’t. I’m not even allowed to know where it is in the house. But every time my father goes out hunting, he comes back with dead squirrels, rabbits. Once he even brought back a whole deer. I felt horrible at first, just lying there looking pitiful. But once momma cooked it, it was delicious.

ELENA: Well your father’s rules apply here in the palace too, Winnah. No handling of anything that looks like its dangerous.  And the same goes for Anna too, okay? There’s a lot going on these days, and I want you both to stay safe. Promise me.

WINNAH: Okay, I promise.

The Life and Times of Julie Parker, by Anna Vargas

IMG_8080ANDY (ADULT): They say when you die, your life flashes before your eyes.

LIGHTS UP on JULIE (YOUNG) standing neutral in front of a swingset as ANDY (ADULT) continues to speak from the side of the stage, papers in his hand.

ANDY (ADULT): I find that ridiculous. First of all, if your entire life was condensed into a single flash, a single moment, it would go by so fast you won’t be able to register the fact that it was your life before it would be over. So for this to be true, it would have to be select scenes from your life. But what dictates what parts are chosen? The happiest moments? The moments most crucial to your development as a person? The saddest moments? Your first steps? Your first breath? What could be so important to relive right before you forget it all?

Finalist Plays

Red Cabinet, by Paul McCoyer

Paul McCoyerELIZA: Ben.

BEN: What?

ELIZA: Can you play checkers with me?

BEN: Sure, lemme go get the board…

He exits. ELIZA notices the red cabinet.

ELIZA: (Shouting) Ben!

BEN: (Shouting from offstage) What?

ELIZA: (Shouting) What’s in the red cabinet?

BEN: (Shouting from offstage) I dunno, why don’t you open it if you’re so curious?

ELIZA sighs, gets up from the table, and opens the cabinet door. She removes a small handgun from the cabinet with a mixed look of curiosity and awe and takes it back to the table with her. BEN re­enters.

BEN: Couldn’t find the checkers and (Tone changes to a worried one) WOAH where did you get that??

ELIZA: (Nonchalantly) In the red cabinet.

BEN: (Nervously) You know what that is, right, Liz?

ELIZA: Yeah. It’s a gun. It’s cool.

BEN: No, no, it’s not cool, it’s dangerous, and you need to put it down right now.

Dodge, by Will Larrocca

Will Larroca(MICHAEL is at a bar.)

M: Bourbon.

(ASHLEY walks next to him.)

A: A Budweiser please.

(She glares at him.)

M: Do I know you?

A: No.

M: Then do you mind not glaring at me? (ASHLEY still glares at him.) Oh, I get it. You watch the news.

A: Maybe.

M: So I’m going to guess that you know who I am.

A: Yes.

M: I’m gonna take another guess and say that you don’t like me.

A: (Sarcastically) You’re good at this.

M: Thank you. Well, let’s get this over with. What do you want to say to me?

A: I just want to let you know that I think you should be ashamed of yourself.

M: (Sarcastically) Wow, you think I should be ashamed! That really hurts my feelings. Well, I don’t feel ashamed so you can save that one.

A: Really? You don’t feel any guilt?

M: Nope. I mean, I’m sorry that he died, but I’m not ashamed of anything I did.

For more of these powerful, poignant student-written plays, come to the FREE staged reading on Sunday, September 6 at 9:30pm! Click here for tickets. Recommended for ages 13 and up due to adult subject matter.

OITC cast